Marty and Karla Grant

www.martygrant.com

Husband: Cpt John Godbold
Born:
Married:
Died: 1765 in Craven Co, SC (now Marion Co, SC)
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Wife: Elizabeth McGurney
Born:
Died:
Father:
Mother:
Spouses:
Children
01 (M): John Godbold
Born: before 1757
Died: after 1786 in Georgetown Dist, SC (now Marion Co, SC)
Spouses: Priscilla Jones
02 (M): James Godbold
Born: before 1757
Died: 1790/1800 in Marion Dist, SC
Spouses: Mourning Elizabeth Baker
03 (M): Thomas Godbold
Born: before 1755
Died: 1821 in Marion Dist, SC
Spouses: Martha Herron
04 (F): Elizabeth Godbold
Born:
Died:
Spouses:
05 (F): Anne Godbold
Born:
Died:
Spouses:
Additional Information

Cpt John Godbold:

Notes:

!REFERENCE:A History of the Old Cheraws pp. 68-67;

!REFERENCE:From: A History of Marion County, South Carolina From Its Earliest Times to the Present, 1901, by W. W. Sellers, Esq., of the Marion Bar. 1902. pp. 117-125. Note from Marty: I've not made much attempt to verify any of the early Godbold information as presented by Mr. Sellers. I'm not related to the Godbold family except by a few intermarriages. :

GODBOLD. John Godbold was the first who came to the region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: "He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in accumulating what for that day was a large property. He settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality." * * * "During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Elizabeth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom the extensive connexion in Marion have descended." To this Bishop Gregg appends a note, in which he says : "Of his sons, John, the oldest, married Priscilla Jones, and had three sons, Zachariah, John and Jesse. Of these, Zachariah was a Captain in the Revolution; James, the second son (of the first John), married Mourning Elizabeth Baker, by whom he had six sons, John, James, Zachariah, Cade, Abram and Thomas. Of these, John and Zachariah were Lieutenants in the Revolution. Thomas, the youngest son, was the father of the late Hugh Godbold, of Marion. Thomas, the third son (of the first old John), married Martha Herron, and had four sons, Stephen, David, Thomas and Ely. Of these, Thomas was the father of Asa Godbold, of Marion, and Elly, who left a son bearing his name." Bishop Gregg, in a note to this note, acknowledges that he got his information, and also much other valuable information, from the late Hugh Godbold, and to whom the Bishop pays a very high compliment. Thus it will be seen that all the Godbolds now in the county, or that have been for many years in the county, and connections through the females, are derived directly from the first old John, who was an Englishman, and not only in the county, but in the State and perhaps in the United States. Many of the descendants of old John emigrated to the Western States. More than forty years ago the writer was in Alabama and Mississippi, and he found Godbolds in those States ; also in Texas, thirty years ago. The writer supposes that, counting the seven or eight generations of them down to the present time, they, per- haps, would number thousands. There are not very many now in the county bearing the name, but their connexions are numerous, and could scarcely be counted, if the attempt to do so was made. As a family, they have always stood high as men of decided character, pluck and energy. General Thomas Godbold, the grand-son of the first old John, had three sons, John, Hugh and Charles, all now dead; yet were and are known to many now living. The late Hugh Godbold was a remarkable man. The writer, on one occasion, heard the late Julius Dargan, of Darlington, say of Hugh Godbold, that he had mind enougth, if he had been educated, to be President of the United States—a very high compliment, coming from the source it did: Charles Godbold was a graduate of the South Carolina College ; studied medicine, but died soon after graduation; never married. Neither Hugh nor Charles left any children. John, the other son, never amounted to much his habits were not good; his matrimonial connection was not such as to promote his social standing. He lived to a ripe old age. Some of his grand-children are among us now.; and some of them are doing much to elevate their branch of the family. The first old John Godbold, Bishop Gregg says, lived to be more than a hundred years old, and died in 1765, a member of the Church of England. Thomas, the third and youngest son of the first old John, and who married Martha Herron, had four sons, Stephen, David, Thomas and Ely. Stephen was the father of the late Stephen G. Godbold, was a well-to-do citizen, and lived in Wahee Township, I think, on the place where Dr. D. F. Miles formerly lived ; he died there. He left but two children ; married twice ; the late Stephen G. Godbold was a son of the first wife, and by the second wife he had a daughter, who is now the widow of the late John F. Spencer, and owns and resides upon her father's patrimony. The late Stephen G. Godbold, a most worthy and estimable man, settled near by his father ; married and had an only child, a daughter, who married the late Francis A. Miles. Mrs. Miles inherited the entire estate of her father, Stephen G. Godbold. Mrs. Miles was the mother of several children; three sons, David Franklin, Samuel A. C. Miles and Stephen G. Miles, and, I think, two daughters, Mrs. W. L. Durant and Mrs. Lide, of Darlington. Of these, Dr. Samuel A. C. Miles and Mrs. Lide are dead; both leaving children. Dr. D. F. Miles is now Clerk of the Court at Marion, and resides there, has a farm in Wahee; is an amiable, worthy gentleman, and a very efficient and accommodating Clerk. Stephen G. Miles is merchandising at Marion, resides there, and has a farm in Wahee, which seems to be run successfully; a very energetic, worthy citizen. Mrs. Durant was left a widow, with six or seven children (small) ; she lives on lands inherited from her mother; has raised her children respectably, and it is said they are promising ; Mrs. Durant is a very excellent lady—a woman of strong sense and full of energy. These Miles are the great-grandchildren of old Stephen Godbold, who was the grand-son of the first old John Godbold. Mrs. Spencer, the daughter of old Stephen Godbold, and who lives on lands he gave her, has ten living children, all grown, and air married, except a son, Nathan. Mrs. Spencer is a worthy lady, of sound, practical sense, and very energetic; she is a great-grand-daughter of the first old John Godbold. Thomas, a brother of old man Stephen, married I do not know whom but he had a son named Thomas, who married Nancy Gasque. The fruits of this marriage were a daughter, who married a Mr. Harrington, I think, of Georgetown ; and sons, Asa Godbold, Jehu, Robert, Thomas, Alexander, Charles, Thomas and
William H., and another daughter, named Martha Ann. Thomas Godbold, the father of these latter, died in 1836 or '7. Asa Godbold, the eldest son of this family, married, in 1828, Miss Sarah Cox, a most excellent lady ; the fruits of this marriage were Mary Jane, James, Thomas W., Asa, Sarah, Anne, Eliza and F. Marion. Asa Godbold, Sr., was a very energetic, persevering man, sharp and shrewd, was elected Ordinary after the death of General E. B. Wheeler, in 1859, which position he held by successive elections until the reconstruction period, and he, like all others of the old regime, was relegated to the rear. His daughter, Mary Jane, married Captain Mat. Stanly, of Mexican War and Confederate reputation, and resides ten or twelve miles below Marion Court House. Captain M. B. Stanly is an importation from Darlington. When a young man he volunteered and went to the Mexican War, was with General Taylor in the several battles around the city of Mexico, and in the storming and capture of that city. When the Confederate War began, he was made Captain of the first company that left Marion, 4th January, 1861, and went to Charleston and joined the first regiment (Maxcy Gregg's), and remained Captain of the company until after the reduction of Fort Sumter, 13th April, 1861. Captain Stanly has several children, two sons and one daughter, who are the men and women of the present generation, and all doing well. James Godbold, son of Asa, Sr., married a daughter of the late W. F. Richardson, below Marion. He has reared a family of two sons and three daughters, the names of whom the writer does not know. Asa Godbold, Jr., married Miss Sallie Ellerbe, sister of the late Captain W. S. Ellerbe; he died a few years ago, leaving a large family of sons and daughters ; the sons are Walter, William, James C, Lawrence and Luther; the daughters, Alice, Mollie, Anne, Victoria, Bessie and Daisy ; of the sons, Walter and William are married of the daughters, Alice, Mollie, Anne and Victoria are married; Bessie and Daisy are unmarried. Of the sons, Walter married a Miss Williams, near Nichols, S. C. ; William married his cousin, Lucy Ellerbe, sister of the late Governor Ellerbe. Of the daughters, Miss Alice married Rev. J. Thomas Pate, now stationed at Florence ; Miss Mollie, J. B. Moore, of Latta, S. C. ; Miss Annie married James Harrel, of Cheraw, S. C. Miss Victoria married W. H. Breeden, of Campbell's Bridge, S. C. The late Thomas W. Godbold, another son of Asa Godbold (senior), was no ordinary man; clear-minded, energetic and industrious ; never married; died about a year ago, at the age of sixty-five. F. M. Godbold, the youngest son of Asa Godbold (senior), married, first, a Miss Vance, in Abbeville County, to which county he removed, and there remained till a few years ago, when he returned to his native county, where he now resides ; by his first wife he had several children ; and she dying, he married another Miss Vance, a cousin of the first wife. Sarah Godbold, second daughter of Asa (senior), married Colonel E. B. Ellerbe, uncle of the late Governor Ellerbe; he some years back moved to Horry County, where he now resides ; has a large family. Annie Eliza Godbold, the youngest daughter of Asa (senior), married Edwin A. Bethea, now of Latta ; they have several children, sons and daughters ; one daughter married to W. C. McMillan, of Marion, but now residing in Columbia, and is said to be doing well ; one son, Asa Bethea, is in Texas; the other children are all with their parents at Latta. We have noticed the families of Stephen and Thomas Godbold, grand-sons of the first old John. Stephen and Thomas had two other brothers, David and Elly. What became of David Godbold and his family, if he had any, is unknown to the writer. The other brother, Elly, had and left a son named Elly, and one named Stephen, usually called Captain Stephen, and one named Ervin M. The son, Elly, afterwards known as Sheriff Elly, and then as General Elly Godbold, was born in 1804. His early educational opportunities were very limited; he could scarcely write his name. The writer had hundreds of business transactions with him while Sheriff for three terms, and never knew him to write anything but his name —never saw any writing said to be his, except his name he could barely write it, yet he was the most remarkable of men ; nature had endowed him with strong intellectual powers, mental acumen and astuteness; he was well versed in human nature ; could look in a man's face and know all about him could almost read his thoughts. He was elected Sheriff for three terms, and served) in that office for four years each term, with entire satisfaction to the people and with credit to himself. During those terms the business of the office was very heavy, as his books will show. He was a model Sheriff, though he could do nothing in the office himself—never pretended to make a settlement with any party ; be had his clerk to do all the office business; don't think his handwriting appears in or on any book kept in his office during his three terms, nor on paper belonging to the office, except in matters where it was required by law for him to sign his name in propria persona. He was run a fourth time for Sheriff, during the Radical regime in 1872, by the white people of the county, and elected, but, like all others of his party in that election, was counted out. He was a successful manager of men ; he knew every man, knew his inclinations and almost his thoughts; he knew his weak points, as well as his strong ones, hence he knew how to turn his innate knowledge of men to advantage. He had military ambition, and rose in the militia of that day by regular gradations from the Captaincy of a company to Brigadier General of the Eighth Brigade, S. C. militia, and performed the duties of that position with satisfaction to all concerned (see supra). He was twice married ; first, to Miss Flowers, by whom he had three sons, Huger, David and Zachariah, and two daughters. Huger married a daughter of Stephen White, by whom he had several children, sons and daughters, when his wife died and left him with her children; the sons, or rather two of them, went West ; one, Waties, is here yet, and married, and lives over Catfish, in Wahee Township; one of the daughters married a Mr. Game, and another married Truman Foxworth ; a third one is yet single. The father, Huger, though a widower for thirty years, has not married again; he is about seventy-five years of age, has been in Washington for eight or ten years ; is in the public printing office. Though seventy-five years old, he looks about as young as he did thirty years ago ; sprightly as a boy, has no gray hairs. General Elly Godbold's son, David, was an the Confederate War, and was killed or, died in it. His son, Zack, married and had four children ; his wife died ; he went off, left his children, all small, married again—don't know what has become of him. His son, D. E. Godbold, the eldest grew up, took care of his sisters; one of the sisters married some one ; another sister died, a young woman ; the youngest sister is yet single ; D. E. Godbold is now at Mullins, merchandising, in partnership with W. McG. Buck, and seems to be doing fairly well. D. E. Godbold married a Miss Young, daughter of the late Johnson B. Young ; he is Mayor of the town of Mullins, is steady, a first rate business man and is bound to succeed. He is very much like his grand-father. General Godbold ; he deserves much credit for his success, so far, and especially for the care he has taken of his orphan sisters. General Elly Godbold was a successful man ; he accumulated a large property. He told the writer just before the war that he had fifty negroes (children) that were not large enough to work in the field. His wife died some years before the war. He remained a widower until the 16th February, 1874, when he married the Widow Kelly, then in Marion; she was forty-five years old and he was seventy —born in 1804. He died suddenly, 12th June, 1874, not quite four months after the second marriage. What became of the General's brother, Stephen T., or Captain Stephen, as he was called, the writer knows not. He was, by no means, such a man as his brother, the General. Ervin M. married Miss Foxworth; is dead; left several children. Recurring back to the sons and grandsons of the old first John, a majority of them must have died childless or removed to other parts. The old first John, as has already been stated, had three sons, John, James and Thomas. John had three sons, Zachariah, John and Jesse. What became of these last three is not stated, and is altogether unknown. The second son of old John was James; James had six sons, John, James, Zachariah, Cade, Abraham and Thomas. No account whatever is given as to these or their posterity, except Thomas, the youngest, who was the father of the late Hugh Godbold, as before stated, and who became a Brigadier General of the militia, and was quite a prominent man in his day; he died in 1825. Thus, five of the grandsons of the old first John seem to have no representatives or descendants in this country. The third son of the old first John was named Thomas, and he had a son named Thomas. This latter Thomas was the father of Asa Godbold (senior), of whom we have already had something to say. It seems that this last Thomas had seven sons, who have already been named only three of them were married; Asa (senior), Robert and William H. ; the others lived in single blessedness, and they are all dead, leaving no representatives. Robert married and died, leaving only a daughter. Of Asa. (senior) and his family, we have already spoken. The only one not yet noticed is William H., the youngest ; he was a doctor, and a most excellent and worthy man ; he married, first, a Miss Mendenhall, of North Carolina ; she died in about a year, leaving no offspring; after the usual lapse of time in such cases, the Doctor married a second time, a Miss Hunt (Mary E.), from about High Point, N. C, a highly accomplished lady— woman of a fine and a cultivated mind. By her the Doctor had four children, two sons, Thomas N. and William H., and two daughters, Mattie and Mary L,. ; the Doctor died when these children were all small ; the mother, with the courage of a Spartan, with her limited means, raised her children respectably, and gave them all a fairly good education; she is yet living. After some years she married Captain J. C. Finklea (Confederate), by whom she had one child, a son; who died, however, at the age of four or five. The eldest son, Thomas N. Godbold, married on the loth January, 1888, the youngest daughter, Mary, of the writer. She has three children living, Thomas Carroll, Anna and Mary E. The second son of Dr. W. H. Godbold, who was named for his father, married, about 1886, a Miss Mattie Beaty, daughter of Hon. James C. Beaty, of Horry County. About seven years ago, he disappeared from home, and has not been heard of since; he left his wife and four small children, two sons and two daughters ; his wife and the children are doing fairly well. Dr. Godbold's oldest daughter, Mattie, married J. E. Stevenson; she died three or four years ago, and left three children, two sons and a daughter ; Mary L., the youngest daughter of the Doctor, married Richard Davis, below Marion ; they are doing very well. There is one circumstance worthy to be noted in the Godbold family, and that is the name Thomas. The first old John had a son by that name ; and his son, James, who had six sons, one of whom was named Thomas, and who became General Thomas Godbold. The third son of old first John was named Thomas, and he had a son named Thomas, called "Tom Cat," not in derision, but to distinguish him from his cousin, Thomas (the General) ; and in most branches of the family, from those early days till the present time, the name Thomas is to be found, and now at this time there are four or five Thomas Godbolds in the family. The late Ervin Godbold, youngest brother of General ,Elly, as already, stated, married a Miss Foxworth, by whom he had five or six children; he was a quiet, inoffensive man, unaspiring, and had the respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens. One of his daughters became the wife of the late S. G. Owens, Clerk of the Court ; she died, and Owens died. Ervin M. Godbold left a son, Thomas, keeping up that name. The writer has dwelt upon the Godbold family to a greater extent than he otherwise would, because the first settlement made about Marion Court House was made, as hereinbefore stated, by John Godbold. It runs over a period of 165 years, and yet the Godbolds are here, by themselves and by their respectable connections, while many who came and settled in other parts of the county, about the same time and before and after, have disappeared; their names have become extinct, either by misfortune, deaths or removals.

Elizabeth McGurney:

Notes:

!SOURCE:A History of the Old Cheraws pp. 68-67;

!SOURCE:A History of Marion County, SC, W. W. Sellers, 1901 p. 117: GODBOLD. John Godbold was the first who came to the region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: "He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in accumulating what for that day was a large property. He settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality."
* * *
"During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Elizabeth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom the extensive connexion in Marion have descended." ... Bishop Gregg, in a note to this note, acknowledges that he got his information, and also much other valuable information, from the late Hugh Godbold, and to whom the Bishop pays a very high compliment. Thus it will be seen that all the Godbolds now in the county, or that have been for many years in the county, and connections through the females, are derived directly from the first old John, who was an Englishman, and not only in the county, but in the State and
perhaps in the United States. Many of the descendants of old John emigrated to the Western States. More than forty years ago the writer was in Alabama and Mississippi, and he found Godbolds in those States ; also in Texas, thirty years ago. The writer supposes that, counting the seven or eight generations of them down to the present time, they, perhaps, would number thousands. There are not very many now in the county bearing the name, but their connexions are
numerous, and could scarcely be counted, if the attempt to do so was made. As a family, they have always stood high as men of decided character, pluck and energy. "

(04) Elizabeth Godbold:

Notes:

!SOURCE:A History of the Old Cheraws pp. 68-67;

!REFERENCE:A History of Marion County, SC, W. W. Sellers, 1901 p. 117: GODBOLD. John Godbold was the first who came to the region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: "He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in accumulating what for that day was a large property. He settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality."
* * *
"During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Elizabeth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom the extensive connexion in Marion have descended." ...

(05) Anne Godbold:

Notes:

!SOURCE:A History of the Old Cheraws pp. 68-67;

!REFERENCE:A History of Marion County, SC, W. W. Sellers, 1901 p. 117: GODBOLD. John Godbold was the first who came to the region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: "He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in accumulating what for that day was a large property. He settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality."
* * *
"During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Elizabeth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom the extensive connexion in Marion have descended." ...

Marriage Notes

!REFERENCE:As to the children of Cpt. John Godbold and Elizabeth McGurney:

From: A History of Marion County, South Carolina From Its Earliest Times to the Present, 1901, by W. W. Sellers, Esq., of the Marion Bar. 1902. pp. 117-125.

GODBOLD. John Godbold was the first who came to the region of Marion Court House. Bishop Gregg, p. 68, says: "He was an Englishman, and had been long a sailor in the British service. Though advanced in years at the time of his arrival, such was his enterprising energy that he succeeded in accumulating what for that day was a large property. He settled in 1735, about a half-mile below the site of the present village of Marion, being the first adventurer to that locality." * * * "During the French and Indian wars, Mr. Godbold was plundered of almost all the personal property he had gathered. Of thirty negroes, twenty-two were taken from him and never recovered ; a trunk of guineas, the fruits of many years' labor, was rifled. He married, after his arrival on Pee Dee, Elizabeth McGurney, by whom he had three sons, John, James and Thomas, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, from whom the extensive connexion in Marion have descended."

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